Taylor Bridge, Manitoba

Taylor Bridge, Manitoba

Object:
Taylor Bridge, Manitoba
Constructor:
Manitoba’s Department of Highways and Transportation
The term of delivery:
October 8, 1998
Products:
GFRP reinforcement

A significant research milestone was achieved on October 8, 1998, when
Manitoba’s Department of Highways and Transportation opened the Taylor
Bridge in Headingley, Manitoba. The two-lane, 165.1-metre-long structure has
four out of 40 precast concrete girders reinforced with carbon FRP stirrups.
These girders are also prestressed with carbon FRP cables and bars. Glass FRP
reinforcement has been used in portions of the barrier walls.
As a demonstration project, it was vital the materials be tested under the same
conditions as conventional steel reinforcement. Thus only a portion of the bridge
was designed using FRPs.
Two types of carbon FRP reinforcements were used in the Taylor Bridge.
Carbon fibre composite cables produced by Tokyo Rope, Japan, were used to
pretension two girders, while the other two girders were pretensioned using
Leadline bars produced by Mitsubishi Chemical Corporation, Japan.
Two of the four FRP-reinforced girders were reinforced for shear using carbon
FRP stirrups and Leadline bars in a rectangular cross section. The other two
beams were reinforced for shear using epoxy-coated steel reinforcement.
The deck slab was reinforced by indented Leadline bars similar to the
reinforcement used for prestressing. GFRP reinforcement produced by Marshall
Industries Composites Inc. was used to reinforce a portion of the Jersey-type
barrier wall. Double-headed, stainless steel tension bars were used for the
connection between the barrier wall and the deck slab.
The bridge incorporates a complex, embedded fibre-optic structural sensing
system that will allow engineers to compare the long-term behaviour of the
various materials. This remote monitoring is an important factor in acquiring
long-term data on FRPs that is required for widespread acceptance of these
materials through national and international codes of practice.
Using 64 single FOSs to monitor the bridge is not, in itself, a new procedure.
What is new and significant in the Taylor Bridge is the use of two experimental,
multiplexed, FOSs called Bragg Gratings that measure strain, loading and
temperature. The sensors are not only immune to electromagnetic interference,
they also have long-term stability in advanced materials.

© “Reinforcing Concrete Structures with Fiber Reinforced Polymers” by ISIS Canada

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